Monthly Archives: August 2016

Still On Oliver Twist

According to John Waller, Charles Dickens contributed to the view that “illegitimate offspring of gentle folk deserved greater esteem than the legitimate children of hardened parish paupers” (76). In his Oliver Twist, Dickens’s third person omniscient narrator reveals that Oliver … Continue reading

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Oliver Twist, continued…

In Oliver Twist, in accordance with Charles Dickens’s social theories, Oliver‘s promotion from a dreadful, lower-class existence to a privileged middle-class life is not a reward for virtuous action. Stephen Gill notes “there can be no negotiation for Oliver between … Continue reading

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Representations of the Damaging Childhood in Literary Works: Oliver Twist, further continued…

On one occasion in his novel Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens uses an authorial intrusion in which he employs personal pronouns in an unusual type of second person narrative, “we” and “us”—implying “you”, in order to build the quality of pathos … Continue reading

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Representations of the Damaging Childhood in Literary Works: Oliver Twist, continued…

By opening his novel Oliver Twist in first person narrative in a style reminiscent of the oral tradition, Dickens gives the reader notice that he is embarking upon an enjoyable story that involves serious subjects: “Among other buildings in a … Continue reading

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Representations of the Damaging Childhood in Literary Works: Oliver Twist.

In his novel, Oliver Twist, Dickens uses satire and irony and, at times, nauseating sentimentality, and a third person omniscient narrative point of view to highlight the harsh realities faced by poor, underprivileged children. Through the all-knowing, all-seeing external narrator, … Continue reading

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